Tag: Constitution (page 1 of 13)

Turkish Delight

[Turkish Flag]Once again, Erdoğan seeks to alter the political structure of the Republic of Turkey. When he became the Prime Minister in 2003, the Turkish state reflected the long Turkish history of seeking Europe. Atatürk created a Western state out of the remains of the Ottoman Empire. The new Republic of Turkey combined France's parliamentary system and anti-clericalism. Since then, Erdoğan has consistently moved Turkey from a French system towards a US system.

The 2017 constitutional referendum marked the latest step. How did it go, and what can we learn about Turkey?

Continue reading

Burundi's Presidential Election

[Flag of Burundi]The Republic of Burundi is a landlocked country in eastern Africa surrounded by Tanzania, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, and Rwanda. It suffered its own genocide in 1972, where 100,000 Hutu and 10,000 Tutsi were killed. Current president, Pierre Nkurunziza, is the son of a Tutsi mother and Hutu father.

Has this son of all Burundi brought the country together?

Continue reading

Bashir Wins

[Flag of Sudan]Omar al-Bashir became president of Sudan in 1989 through a coup d'état. Since then, he won the elections of 1996, 2000, and 2010. As discussed in Bashir and Sudan, the 2015 elections were held between April 13 and 16.

Did Bashir win these elections?

Continue reading

The PML-N Wins 18

[Flag of Pakistan]Pakistan is the sixth most populous country in the world. It is primarily located between India and Afghanistan, although it shares a desert border with Iran and a mountainous border with China. As a former British colony, one would expect its government style to be based on the Westminster model. However, Pakistan is a federal parliamentary republic with a president.

The ruling party won 18 of the 48 seats in the Senate in Friday's election. What does this mean for Pakistan?

Continue reading

Sisi Wins in a Landslide

[Flag of Egypt]Egypt's trek from Mubarek's overthrow to a stable nation has been long and arduous. The celebrations in Tahrir Square seem far too distant. The jubilation of the prospect of a genuine democracy seems a dream from last night. In the days since the protests against President Hosni Mubarek began, Egyptians have experienced at least two coups d'état, three constitutional referenda, and two presidential elections.

Is Sisi's election what Egypt needs?

Continue reading

Older posts